BOOK DEDICATIONS

 

Les Grands hommes de la France Championnet, 1881, Lycée Condorcet school prize inscribed by a young Proust

"To Doctor
Mirza Irymed-Abedine
Khan Moïnol-Abebha
Private physician
of His Imperial Highness
Crown Prince of Persia
in respectful
and most sympathetic gratitude for
his kind gift
Marcel Proust."

 


La Revue Blanche (Vol V July-August 1893)

To Laure Hayman:

"To Madame Laure Hayman (the printed dedication - that out of tact was not made more direct - should prove to her the constant reminder of her servant - who, to her, is quite forgotten - he has all too clear signs of it!). Very respectfully, Marcel Proust."

 


Un Dimanche au Conservatoire  (Published in Le Gaulois 14 january 1895)

To Lucien Daudet:

"To Monsieur Lucien Daudet, in memory of the Duke of Richmond and of the pink carnations. His devoted Marcel Proust."



 La Mort de Baldassare Silvande (Published in la Revue hebdomadaire 29 October 1895)

To Madame Georges de Porto-Riche:

"To Madame de Porto-Riche, in the absurd hope that a true aim and a word endured, mingles our dreams for a moment.
A friend of your son's,
Marcel Proust."

 


Portraits de peintres 1896

To Clément de Maugny:

"To my friend Clément de Maugny. In grateful remembrance. Marcel Proust."

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To Pierre Lavallée:

"To Pierre Lavallée Poet and musician this poetry devoid of music and this music full of poetry. Your grateful friend (Saturday 20 March) Marcel Proust."

 


Les Plaisirs et les Jours 1896

To Louis d'Albufera and Louisa de Mornand: (October 1903)

[Long dedication/letter translated in Selected Letters 1880-1903.]

"To your reproaches of yesterday evening in Larue's [...] I am responding nobly, with this allegorical gift, in the form of this flowery book, from a greater part of my past. [...] Our books are never anything more than retrospective confidences to those who did not know us."

To Gaston Bérardi:

"To Monsieur Gaston Bérardi, with respectful and profound gratitude. Marcel Proust 14 April 1896."

To Antoine Bibesco:

"To Antione Bibesco, whom I love and admire.
The 30th October 1901, ten o'clock in the evening.

'Goodnight sweet Prince
and flights of angels
sing thee to thy rest.'
(Hamlet!)

Marcel Proust.
Frankly it's only good enough to put in a drawer (this copy)."

[on the back]:

"To Antoine Bibesco. This photograph of me is from an era when he did not know me."

To René Blum: (9 November 1913)

"To René Blum, his very affectionate and grateful friend.
Dear friend,
I would like to think that this book will extend a little into the past our friendship which began so late and has so few reparations. But I wouldn't want you neglect for this Marcel that you didn't know and who I think has "changed" and "grown" the one who with a little attention, and by not complying to certain prejudices of your single minded nature, you will discover I think in A la Recherche du Temps Perdu.
Marcel Proust."

To Madame de Brantes

"To Madame de Brantes, that she may accept the respectful homage of this book whose sole reward will be that it had pleased her, when it was scattered and formless, and that the benevolence of her sympathy - in this circumstance alone I will not say the clairvoyance of her wit and taste - has distinguished and elected it. Her friend, M.P."

To Madame Arman de Caillavet:

"Friday 12 June 1896. To Madame Arman de Caillavet. One of those women who, nourished by the sweetness of luxury and the arts... give to life, with the spice of their intelligence... a delicate flavour which we would not have known without them... She had the soul of a philosopher... without losing any of her pride or her grace. You could not meet a sweeter person. There is no more gracious supporter... (Anatole France: La Vie littéraire); in assuring her of my respectful and grateful friendship, and always thinking of her, chosen by the author of Lys rouge, in the famous line: "The friendship of a great man is a favour from the Gods". Marcel Proust."

To Gaston Calmann-Lévy:

"As a token of sincere friendship and in an homage of remembrance to the memory of his brother Paul."

To Gaston Calmette:

"To Monsieur Gaston Calmette. In most sincere and grateful memory of his benevolent and precious support. Marcel Proust."

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To Nicolas Cottin (in September 1909):

"To Nicolas Cottin, to cheer ourselves up from the first days of weariness for his wife in Champignol in spite of us."

[allusion to the play Champignol malgré lui by G. Feydeau & Desvallières, revived at L'Ambigu, 10 June 1909]

To Max Daireaux (1908):

"If they called me Plantevignes"
(an old song)

To Max Daireaux,
In memory of the sisters in Disappointment, Yvonne and Germaine, in the society of the ladies M… and M…

Litanies of the Cabourgian aspirant
Oh Lord, I have known in the Hotel de Cabourg, which is more properly the hill of Jerusalem, the race that you wished to be born. It is not always pleasant, and the pagans that it gathers for itself neither blossom nor smell sweet in roses or in graces as in the gardens of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. From Hungary there is no Saint Elizabeth here, but Mlle A… Oh Lord, grant that one fine evening I may see rising over the waves the pastel and bluish sky out which the eyes of Mlle D… have been cut, taking from it also two nimble wings that quiver at the corner of her nose. Grant me that I may write my piece about d’A… and not write it, through the consciousness which would be pleasing to me in which Mlle C… lives a life of humility and Mlle d’A… is divested of pride. Grant that I may find a mistress in Cabourg and that it not be Mme R… (France). Oh Lord, grant me that I may learn to know the special signs that allow me to distinguish young W… from young P…, from young D… and young L… so that I may penetrate to some degree in understanding of the inconstant soul of Mme M… As for young P… I shall never take him for other than himself, and may thus be preserved from the fatal error of Mme de L[a T[our] d’A[uvergne]. Oh Lord, grant it that I may never be introduced to Mme O[rosdi] and that I may frequently take, without causing displeasure, the path to the villa Suzanne.

To Alphonse Darlu:

"With grateful admiration and friendship. Your respectful pupil. Marcel Proust."

To Alphonse Daudet

"To Monsieur Alphonse Daudet. With my boundless admiration before an imagination of genius, a beauty of artistry, a saintly life. His  respectful and grateful Marcel Proust."

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To Comtesse de Fitz James:

"To Madame Comtesse Robert de Fitz James, with my admiration for all her delicacies of wit and of her heart. Her respectful and grateful friend, Marcel Proust. Friday 12 June 96."

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To Vincent Griffon:

"To Monsieur Vincent Griffon as a token of my ardent affection, your faithful and attentive friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Étienne Grosclaude:

"To Monsieur Etienne Grosclaude 'A fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy' (Hamet). Marcel Proust."

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To Armand Duc de Guiche: (April 1903)

"To the Duc de Guiche, to the true one rather than to the real, to he who would have been, more than to he who is.
To his other self which I passionately preferred to him.
In true and most affectionate testimony to the rich possibilities that I have seen revealed in him, I offer this barely resemblant portrait of a Marcel Proust which he did not know.
With the assurance of my devoted and deep affection. M.P."

To Armand Duc de Guiche: (April 1906)

"To the duc de Guiche
Impromptu genealogy in doggerel:
His friend, Marcel Proust.

To the dear Vicomte de Larbuste
Many good wishes knows Marcel Proust
Because without the good Garcia Sanche
I would not have been able this Sunday
To write the name of Armand d'Aure
And to repeat that in him I adore
The exquisite unniggardly wit
Of the tenth (?) duc de Guiche.

His friend, Marcel Proust."

To Laure Hayman:

"To Madame Laure Hayman, for the infinite delicacy of her heart, her beauty and her incomparable wit.
Her friend, Marcel Proust. June 1896."

To Monsieur Jules (?):

"To Monsieur Jules. In most sympathetic and most grateful homage from the author. Marcel Proust. 14 February 1903."

To Pièrre Lavallée:

[Long dedication/letter translated in Selected Letters 1880-1903.]

"[...] this particular copy deserves a special dedication. A book read by you, especially a copy of one of my books, is not like any other [...] I say my book as though I were never to write another. You know well enough that that is not true. [...]"

To Émile Mâle:

"To Émile Mâle, as a token of profound admiration, and respectful and ardent gratitude. Marcel Proust."

To Clément de Maugny:

[Long dedication dated 13 July 1899 is translated in Selected Letters 1880-1903.]
On page 198 Chapter XI "Amité" Proust has written:

"On rereading this page I find a sort of 'pre-established harmony' between it and our friendship. I believe it is the expression of a sensibility. Or rather today I find it filled with a presentiment. If I am its author, you are its subject. 'Habet sua fata libelli'. They could not be more fortunate than to fall into the hands of those who, through a distant action, from one unknown to another, have inspired them in advance. So this belongs to you twice over, perhaps not so much as your friend does wholly to you. M.P. To my dear C. de M."

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To Madame Carl Meyer:

"To Madame Carl Meyer. As a token of gratitude. Her respectful admirer, Marcel Proust."

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To Louis Millet:

"To Monsieur Louis Millet. In respectful remembrance, and with much gratitude for the precious hours spent at Avranches.Your devoted Marcel Proust."

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To Paul Morand: (1921)

Les Paisirs et les jours dedication to Paul Morand

To Albert Namhias:

"To Monsieur Albert Namhias. As a token of my ardent gratitude. 6 November 1911. Marcel Proust."

To Albert Nahmias's father:

"As a token of my ardent gratitude. 6 November 1911. Marcel Proust."

To Marcel Plantevignes:

"To my dear Marcel Plantevignes. In memory of dear Cabourg, this Cabourg of happy encounters. Marcel Proust."

To Robert Proust:

"Oh brother, more dear than the light of day (Corneille)."

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To Henri de Régnier:

"To Monsieur Henri de Régnier. As a token of admiration and friendship. Marcel Proust."

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To Bertrand de Salignac Fénelon:

"To Bertrand de Salignac Fénelon, in the hope that he will come to equal the great literary name that he carries, and in the less certain hope of becoming his friend. Marcel Proust.
30 October 40 minutes past midnight."

To Dr Sollier:

"To Monsieur Doctor Sollier as a token of my profound and respectful gratitude. Marcel Proust."

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To Paul Souday:

"Dear Sir, I am very late getting in touch with you (as too are you with me, I still don't know whether you have received my "De luxe" Jeunes filles en fleurs). If I were less ill I would write you a long letter (felix morbus!) to thank you with all my heart and to defend myself, on the subject of "style". We are in total agreement in any case as regards metaphors; as you will see. I am certain that, having no more liking for fabricated verse than I, even splendidly fabricated, all the same you will admit that Baudelaire found himself led to endowing with wings a devotion that he claimed to make rise up into the heavens. The Wright brothers did the same thing. The wing of death in Renan is something else. And it would need all your ingenuity to justify that apostolic barque setting sail for Greece, by the fact that the apostles were fishermen (in fresh water) in the sea of Galilee. - I offer you this book to show you that at the age of sixteen, the year of its composition (not of its publication) I had a little gift for style. A benevolent soothsayer had been able to say to me "Tu Marcellus eris". But the "aspera fata" have come. Receive with this book that is looking forward to the honour of one day coming into your hands (habent sua fata libelli) my admiring, grateful and devoted respects. Marcel Proust."

To Madame Straus:

"To Madame Straus. In admiring, respectful and grateful homage from her friend, Marcel Proust. 12 June 1896."

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To Jacques Truelle:

"To Jacques Truelle the Roman, for whom my friendship was born in the woods of Combray (after Cirre and the Meurice) and that his too lengthy expatriations alone have chilled by enfeeblement the inseparable memory of absences in which the human heart no longer has the strength to make reborn that that he has loved. Marcel Proust. M. Souday will quite rightly find that that expression is not French, something genuinely troubling, addressed as it is to a young inhabitant of the countryside of Sylvie that has the profile of the spire of Senlis seen, in a blue distance, beyond the harvests from the Île de France, from the landing stairs. M.P. (article about les Jeunes filles en fleurs by M. Souday)."

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To Narcisse Weil:

"...before the exhaustions..."

To Léon Yeatman:

"To Léon Yeatman. In the memory and the hope of a true friendship. Marcel Proust."

Other known dedicatees: Pierre Loti, Comte Robert de Montesquiou, Colonel Picquart.



La Bible d'Amiens 1904

To Odilon and Céleste Albaret:

"To my very dear Odilon and to his wife who I love just as much, this little book to which I would prefer a thousand times more to go with them to see Amiens cathedral and so many other beautiful things without us ever leaving each other. Marcel Proust."

To Georges Bazaine:

"To Monsieur Georges Bazaine. This little guide to Amiens which might be useful to him if he ever goes there to gaze on the masterpiece of his XIIIth century colleagues. In friendly recollection, Marcel Proust."

To Jacques-Émile Blanche:

"To Jacques Émile Blanche, his admirer and his grateful friend Marcel Proust."

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To Dr Boissière (or Bize?):

"In homage from the translator, his grateful patient. Marcel Proust."

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To Émile Boutroux:

"To Émile Boutroux. As a token of respectful admiration and in memory of the friendship that he properly wanted to convey to my father. Marcel Proust."

To Mme Arman de Caillavet:

"In respectful homage. Marcel Proust."

To Alfred Capus:

"To Monsieur Alfred Capus. As a token of admiration - and in grateful memory of "happy minutes" in the train from Paris to Tours. Marcel Proust."

To princesse de Caraman Chimay:

"To princesse Alexandre de Caraman Chimay, the greatest admiration from one "Excluded", Marcel Proust."

To Dr Cottel:

"To Doctor Cottel. His affectionate friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Max Daireaux:

"To Max Daireaux. In friendly remembrance."

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To Abel Desjardins:

"To Abel Desjardins his friend Marcel Proust."

To Paul Desjardins:

"From your grateful admirer."

To Dr Maurice de Fleury:

"To Dr Maurice de Fleury. As a token of my very special and admiring gratitude. Marcel Proust."

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To Anatole France:

"To Monsieur Anatole France. In homage of my infinite admiration, my respectful affection and my gratitude for a kindness impossible to forget. Marcel Proust."

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To Robert Gangnat:

"To Robert Gangnat. In the hope of an invitation - and a friendship. Marcel Proust."

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To Georges Goyau

"To Monsieur Georges Goyau. His affectionate and grateful admirer. Marcel Proust."

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To Fernand Gregh:

"To my dear Fernand, his friend who admires him. Marcel Proust."

To Reynaldo Hahn:

"Little Ruskin not being able to thank you himself for the ravishing laments that you have had poured out to the Muses, since the days of his death, I am forced to express his gratitude to you myself and his admiration for your brotherly genius. And it is I who thanks you, oh my little Reynaldo, oh the greatest affection of my life; you know that this little book was dedsicated to you, while I had my little Papa. But he wanted to see it appear so much that, now, I prefer to take it back from you and to offer it to him.
Come on my little Master, don't mockery your pony in his "new English exercises" that are perilous enough. And above all very boring.
Marcelch."

To Mrs Higginson:

"To Madame Higginson. In respectful remembrance and as an expression of my profound regret at no longer seeing her, this book that I would never have been able to bring out without her, her very grateful Marcel Proust."

To Henri Joubert:

"To Monsieur Henri Joubert. As a too unequal exchange for your delightful and sad verses for which I will thank you more fully when I am a little less ill than I am now. Your grateful friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld:

"To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld, his grateful friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Pierre Lavallée:

"To Pierre Lavallée. His friend Marcel."

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To Suzette Lemaire:

"To Mademoiselle Suzette Lemaire, as a testimony of my most profound and most respectful friendship, her admirer, Marcel Proust."

To Émile Mâle:

"In homage to a profound admiration. Marcel Proust. (I have taken the liberty, Sir, of quoting from your book constantly, and on every page in chapter IV)."

To Roger Marx:

"To Monsieur Roger Marx. In testimony of his great literary esteem. Marcel Proust."

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To Comte Clément de Maugny:

"To Clément de Maugny. In homage of my grateful, unalterable and profound tenderness. Marcel Proust."

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To Comte Robert de Montesquiou:

"To Comte Robert de Montesquiou. As a token of an admiration and a friendship already long standing and constantly renewed. Marcel Proust."

To Louisa de Mornand:

[From Selected Letters 2, 1904-1909.]

"Dedication not to be left lying around. To Louisa Mornand. Ringed by the blaze of her adorer's eyes.
Mornand
is certainly not the present participle of the verb morner, for this archaic verb had a meaning which I don't remember exactly but which was extremely improper. And God knows... Alas! - For those who have had no success with you - that is to say everyone - other women cease to be attractive. Whence this couplet:
   He who Louisa cannot win,
   Must be content with Onan's sin.
I love you and admire you with all my heart. Marcel."

To Eugène Mutiaux:

"To Eugène Mutiaux, as a token of profound affection, Marcel Proust."

To Albert Nahmias:

"To my dear collaborator and great friend. Marcel Proust."

To Mme de Noailles:

"(The book is unreadable for a "pagan" wife and an anticlerical husband. But perhaps Anne-Jules (see Ruskin's introduction) if he is still a believer can find in it a little history of the Scriptures, some history of France and of archaeology. In any case I've had him sent a copy which I addressed to Dr Cottet by mistake).
To Madame Comtesse Mathieu de Noailles. "Who knows to what final success, nature, part of the primitive activity, will not achieve? It is certain that the apparition on earth of a woman who unites with the genius of Victor Hugo and Montaigne the beauty of Cleopatra and the heart of St Francis of Assissi, is something difficult for us to imagine. But if such a creature has not existed up until now, can we reasonable conclude that such a one has never existed?" (Ernest Renan, Discours et conférences). With the homage of her respectful friend who admires her more than anyone in the world. Marcel Proust."

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To Mme de Pierrebourg:

"To Madame de Pierrebourg. As a token of respectful gratitude. Marcel Proust."

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To Marcel Plantevignes:

"To my very dear Marcel Plantevignes
On the day before leaving him and seeing come to an end this summer which will remain for me the one in which I discovered the charm of an ardent and profound soul, always vibrant and quickened by the four winds of the mind, I form for the perfect and fecund maturation of his mind still in flower, for the fulfilment and the sweetness of beautiful fruits that I shall not see, an ardent and pious wish, and I repeat to myself with melancholy these lines from Sully Prudhomme:

Here on earth all the lilacs wither,
All songs of the birds are short lived,
I dream of creatures that will remain
   Always!
Here on earth all men weep
For their friendships or their loves,
I dream of friends who will remain
   Always!

These lines from Verlaine:

Oh, when will the roses of September bloom again!

These lines from d'Aubigné:

An autumn rose is more exquisite than any other...

And these  lines from Baudelaire, that so often in the evening, at the age of fifteen, when like my dear Marcel I still had delightful parents, a mother who was intelligent and good like his mother, a father who was intelligent and good like his father, and when I myself too was a young Marcel, less wise and less strong and less intelligent and less good than the one into whose beloved hands I place this book and other things more precious, I would often say at the setting of the sun with a feeling less painful and less utterly autumnal than today:

But everything today is painful for me
And nothing, neither the sun, nor your words, nor the hearth,
Is worth to me the sun beaming on the sea
The task is short, the tomb awaits, it is voracious
Ah, leave me...........
To taste with regret the white and torrid summer
Of autumn's end the sweet yellow ray.

May he at least, if he travels through Amiens, this book in his hand, one frosted day of Autumn or Winter, as Ruskin advises, remember that this guide was given to him one sad September evening at Cabourg, when the cinematographic show was about to begin and may he find on visiting the sacred old stones of the Venice of the North in the company of this melancholy pilgrim, a little of the sweetness I felt beside him the day before seeing approach us in mournful and magical dress Saint-Omer, described on a play-bill, Ruskinian perhaps but without knowing it, as the Venice of the North."

To Edouard Rod:

"To Monsieur Edouard Rod. As a token of respectful and profound admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Mme Staus:

"To Madame Straus. Her respectful and grateful admirer. As a token of his most lively and profound attachment. Marcel Proust."

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To Mlle Marguerite Thomson [or Kiki Bartholini?]:

"I was going to write to Coco. But Reynaldo Hahn told me that he has left for Versailles... So if his response comes to you a little late, don't blame your respectful and profound admirer. Marcel Proust."

To Vicomte Eugène-Melchior de Vogüé:

"To Monsieur the Vicomte E.M. de Vogüé. In respectful and grateful homage. Marcel Proust."

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To unknown recipient:

"To an Angel from Chartres, to a champion from Reims, this 'Bible of Amiens'. As a memento from the translator, Marcel Proust. PS. Et Incarnatus est. That the most modern (in the sense of very [illegible]) and the most powerful Spirit [illegible] may be incarnate in this piece of architecture or rather [...]"

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To unknown recipient:

"To Monsieur [...] Affectionate and grateful homage. Marcel Proust." [Name of recipient erased]

Other known dedicatees: Mme Daudet, Léon Daudet, Lucien Daudet, Léon Brunschvicg, Bertrand Fénelon, Daniel Halévy, Henri Bordeaux, Louis de Robert, Robert Dreyfus, Gabriel Mourrey, Willy, Francis de Miomandre, Abbé Vignot, Mme de Brantes, Maurice Barrès, Abel Hermant, Henri Gans, Henri Bergson, Henri Rochat.


Sésame et les Lys 1906

To Leon Belugou:

"To Monsieur L Belugou. Amicable and grateful remembrance. Marcel Proust."

To Henry Bernstein:

"To my dear Henry Bernstein. With all the warmth of my admiration and my friendship. Marcel Proust."

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To Emmanuel Bibesco:

"Whit-Sunday.
To Emmanuel Bibesco, who is ignorant of the art of visiting and the delicacies of friendship. He doesn't understand the middle ground between absence - and invasion... (who almost comes to regret it) practised at distant intervals and where he has himself followed by a horde of captives, captives with dark eyes and beautiful locks. All that doesn't seem to me a qualification for receiving this book, any more than having just dined at the Baignère's. But actually my dear friend here is my reason: you would be an angel if you could send me as soon as possible the addresses of Vuillard and Maurice Denis. Your devoted Marcel Proust. I forgot two things, to express to you my deep friendship and to ask you for René Blum's address."

To Jacques Emile Blanche:

"To Jacques Emile Blanche In admiration of the painter and the writer. His grateful friend.  Marcel Proust."

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To Henry Bordeaux:

"To Henry Bordeaux. His admirer and his friend, Marcel Proust."

To Pierre du Breuil de Saint-Germain:

"To Pierre du Breuil de St-Germain in friendly remembrance. Marcel Proust."

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To Stéphane Brossard:

"A copy for Stéphane Brossard to read in that room in Chateaudun pages 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20, and envying him his visit to the place I have loved so much. In affectionate memory of the author who regrets not being able to be his travelling companion. M.P."

To Ferdinand Brunetière:

"To Monsieur Ferdinand Brunetière. As a token of respectful admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Comtesse Chevigné:

"In respectful homage and admiration, Marcel Proust."

To André Chevrillon:

"To Monsieur André Chevrillon. As a token of ardent admiration for La Jeunesse de Ruskin and in friendly memory. Marcel Proust."

To Professor Dejenire:

"To Monsieur Professor Dejenire. As a token of respectful gratitude. Marcel Proust".

To Paul Desjardins:

"...his grateful and devoted admirer..."

To Paul Desjardins:

"To Monsieur Paul Desjardins. With my admiring and devoted respects. Marcel Proust. (Have you received my Bible d'Amiens my dear fellow?)"

To Lucien Fontaine:

"To Monsieur Lucien Fontaine who I would like to thanks (page 170 in the note) and who I have quoted several times from the Bulletin. As a token of his friendly attachment, Marcel Proust."

To Anatole France:

"To Monsieur Anatole France. With my highest admiration, with my deepest gratitude. His respectful friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Robert Gangnat:

"To Robert Gangnat. His friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Fernand Gregh:

"To Fernand Gregh. His admirer and his friend. Marcel Proust."

To Gaston Griolet:

"To Monsieur Gaston Griolet. In admiring and respectful tribute from the translator, Marcel Proust."

To Laure Hayman:

"In memory of a deep affection."

To Abel Hermant:

"To Abel Hermant, his admirer and friend. Marcel Proust."

To Edmond Jaloux:

"Dear Sir, I was gravely ill for an entire year and couldn't tell you how much I enjoyed your delightful Jeune Homme au masque which I received in a sanatorium where I was forbidden from writing. I send you Sésame in admiring friendship. Marcel Proust."

To Louis Hellen Lanier:

"To doctor Louis Hellen Lanier, his friend, Marcel Proust."

To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld:

"To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld, his abandoned friend, Marcel Proust."

To Hubert de La Rochefoucauld:

"To comte Hubert de La Rochefoucauld. In sympathetic homage. Marcel Proust."

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To Georges de Lauris:

"To Georges de Lauris. Every day more affectionately, with growing reason to love him, and also a growing absence of reasons that increase that friendship of such consciousness and such unconsciousness to assure him more forcefully and more lastingly. Example of a phrase not to be imitated and that you can quote back to me every time I venture any criticism of yours. I win the right more than ever of telling you nothing... Marcel."

To Pierre Lavallée:

"To Pierre Lavallée. As a memento of a faithful and forsaken friend. Marcel Proust".

To Suzette Lemaire:

"To Mademoiselle Suzette Lemaire, to whom I have no need to offer a hand written dedication because she will find her name at the head of the second part of the book: Lilies of Queens' Gardens, which applies so well to her, being dedicated to the benevolent influence of the ideal woman, which applies so well to you, Queen, you who like to paint the lilies of your garden. Your respectful friend, Marcel Proust".

To Pierre Loüys:

"To Monsieur Pierre Loüys. As a testimony of admiring sympathy. Marcel Proust."

To Fernand Lubet-Barbon:

"As a token of gratitude."

To M. and Mme R. de Madrazo:

"To Monsieur and Madame R. de Madrazo. With respectful homage from their admirer, Marcel Proust."

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To Maurice Maeterlinck:

"To Monsieur Maurice Maeterlinck. In apology for having respectfully contradicted him in the notes to pages 80 and 81 and quoted a little throughout the preface and in the text, and in assuring him of my profound admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Comte Clément de Maugny:

"To Clément de Maugny. In fond memory. Marcel Proust"

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To Comte Robert de Montesquiou:

"To Comte Robert de Montesquiou. As a token of admiration and grateful friendship. Marcel Proust."

To Louisa de Mornand:

"'You whom I might have loved, as well you knew!' To Mademoiselle de Mornand. To my dear preferred admired one. Her friend, Marcel Proust."

To Eugène Mutiaux:

"To Eugène Mutiaux, as a token of profound affection, his godson, Marcel Proust."

To Albert [Nahmias?]:

"To my dear Albert, as a token of my profound gratitude. His friend, Marcel Proust."

To Anna de Noailles:

"To Madame Princesse de Brancovan. Respectful homage from her admirer Marcel Proust."

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To Louis Parent:

"To Monsieur Louis Parent as a token of affectionate gratitude for the exquisite understanding of his youthful but already mature mind. His friend Marcel Proust"

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To Joseph? Paul-Boncour:

"To Monsieur Paul Boncour. His admiring friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Arthur Pernolet:

"To Monsieur Pernolet. As a token of respect to a neighbour who is very close to him and very far away. Marcel Proust.
"If, parting with the companions that have given you all the best joy you had on Earth, you desire the promise made to you from a time when you could  meet their eyes again and clasp their hands, where eyes shall no more be dim, nor hands fail..." (The Bible of Amiens) RUSKIN"

[Slight misquotation, made from memory by Proust]

To André Picard:

"To André Picard. His friend Marcel Proust."

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To Camille Plantevignes:

"To Monsieur Camille Plantevignes, for reading on the railway and with the hope that these pages about childhood will evoke for him a little that of his son and of his own. In grateful homage, Marcel Proust."

To Jean Sardou:

[Pastiche of Ruskin:] "From Marcel Proust to M. Jean Sardou. Extract from Ruskin, Modern Painters. The most remarkable Turner I know [...]"

To Edouard Trogan:

"To Monsieur Edouard Trogan. As a token of grateful goodwill. Marcel Proust."

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Other known dedicatees:  Lucien Daudet, Marcel Plantevignes, Charles Grandjean.

 


Quatre Evangiles, by Emile Zola

Sent to Collette, October 1911:

"In memory of an unbeliever."

 


Du Coté de chez Swann 1913

To Céleste and Odilon Albaret:

"To Céleste Gineste, tender spouse of Odilon Albaret, in memory of my profound and very grateful affection for you both. Their devoted friend, M.P. July 1916."

To André Arnyvelde:

"To Monsieur Arnyvelde. As a memento of deep friendship and gratitude after an hour spent together. Marcel Proust."

To Gabriel Astruc:

"Dear Sir, I am infinitely touched that the man who has endowed Paris with a monument and a theatre , and whose work will one day be acknowledged and acclaimed by all, should have been so kind as to write me that most flattering and moving letter. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. And if you would be so good as to exchange for this, the only copy of the first edition I have left, the one in which you have taken the trouble to underline all the mistakes, it would be of great help to me for the imminent fourth impression. I would have taken much pleasure in what you send me and in chatting with you about it. But I am working under such painful attacks right now that that will be long delayed. With my most affectionate regards, yours gratefully, Marcel Proust."

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To Henri Bataille:

"To Monsieur Henri Bataille, as a token of my profound admiration. Marcel Proust."

To Jean Béraud:

"To Monsieur Jean Béraud. As a respectful token of my deepest gratitude and admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Walter Berry:

"To Monsieur Walter Berry.

Monsieur, you probably think as I do that the wisest, the most poetic, the best, are not those who put all their poetry, all their kindness and all their knowledge into their work but those who have the adroitness and prodigality to keep some of it for their lives. The story of the binding with the arms of the Guermantes is so beautiful that, while awaiting the poet who, let us hope, cannot fail to emerge to celebrate it (and I would offer myself up if need be), it already needed a poet to create and experience it. It is in this sense that I suggest that a residuum of your knowledge and your poetic conception of life was already inherent in this story. Things do not only have the lachrymae that Virgil speaks of. At this moment I prefer to call to mind a Latin proverb related to this in meaning: Habent sua fata libelli. [Books have their fate] I am convinced that in the complex sequence of causes and effects, the fatum of this little book decreed that, through you, it should come to the person who exhumed the Guermantes from their tombs and sought to revive the lustre of the extinct name. May its destiny not stop there; may it also have been to bring together, in order to weave between them 'the mysterious threads by which our hearts are linked', the wonderful discoverer who made an even rarer present from the one celebrated in Sylvestre Bonnard and his most grateful and admiring
Marcel Proust.

July 1916."

[Partially translated in Selected Letters 3 1910-1917.]. His admirer and his friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Emmanuel Bibesco:

"To Prince Emmanuel Bibesco. With my profound affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Princesse Marthe Bibesco:

"To Madame Princesse de Bibesco. In homage and respectful admiration. Marcel Proust."

To René Blum:

"To Monsieur René Blum. Dear René, I want you to have this rather elegant first edition which Grasset sent me. In this way you get back the book which you brought forth, with such a noble gesture, consecrated by a great artist, and who carried forth the head of Orpheus. Your grateful friend, Marcel Proust.
Had I not been quite so exhausted I wanted to copy out here the phrases ("more unsubtantial, with more vitality, more faithful, the smell and taste of things alone remain to remind us, to fix, to convey in the tiny and almost impalpable drop of their essence, the vast edifice of memory")1 that you had liked and that you read aloud to me the other evening. And because of that these words retain, rolled up in them like dainty and sombre slings that rugged and sweet sonorousness of your severe and tender voice, your voice of a critic and a friend."

1. Slightly inaccurate quotation from the madeleine episode.

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To René Boylesve:

"To Monsieur René Boylesve. As a token of profound admiration. Marcel Proust."

To Émile Boutroux:

"To Monsieur Émile Bouroux. As a token of respectful admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Madame de Brantes:

"To Madame de Brantes. As a token of respectful and profound affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Stéphane Brossard:

"To Monsieur Stéphane Brossard, in cordial remembrance, Marcel Proust."

To Louis Brun:

"To Monsieur Brun, this book that has now passed to the Nouvelle Revue Française has not forgotten its first love for Grasset. In affectionate remembrance, Marcel Proust."

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To Gaston de Caillavet:

"your old friend Marcel Proust." Attached letter: "Dear Gaston, I am delighted with your award. And as I am very ill I am not sending you lengthy congatulations, but I assure you that they are very ardent and strongly felt and it makes me rejoice to know you as "officer", it's the same deep affection I had for you when you were a soldier, and you wrote to me "dear Sir", so that I loved you already. Best to you, Marcel Proust."

To Gaston Calmette:

"...I have often felt that you care little for my writings. But should you ever have time to read a few pages of my novel, especially in the second part, I think you would at least make my acquaintance..."

To Madame Catusse:

"...In the moments when I support the new - and very old - philosophy which suggests that souls live on, I am drawn towards it..."

To the Duchesse de Clermont-Tonnèrre:

"To Madame duchesse de Clermont-Tonnèrre. In respectful homage. Marcel Proust."

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To Jean Cocteau:

[Dedication covers 3 pages, concerning a letter by Mme de Sévigné that he had promised to read to Cocteau. The passage, written by Mme de Sévigné 12 June 1680 would be transcribed by him in A l'Ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs.]

"As I have quoted it in one of my future Ss [Swanns] which I have the proofs for I will copy you the passage."

[Proust finds the passage and copies it.]

"I put in all the bonnets, cassocks that were necessary. I'm going on the promenade, I hear a thousand idle tales... After all that I no longer dare say anything about myself."

To Colette:

"To Madame Colette. In admiring homage, Marcel Proust."

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To Jules Cottet:

"To Doctor Cottet. In distant memory of a friend whose absence has not diminished but ripened his attachment. His affectionate Marcel Proust."

To Céline Cottin:

"The sick in perpetuity"

To Ernest de Crauzat: (1919)

"To M. E. de Crauzat with whom I fervently regret, since I had in this case met him at the home of the dear and kindly and learned doctor Gagey, not being able to arrange a meeting in order to thank him: from the Côté de Boulevard Haussmann. Marcel Proust."

To Ernest de Crauzat:

"To M. de Crauzat, resident (as was I up until about the year 1898) of boulevard Malesherbes. I lived there in a townhouse belonging to old M. de Lubersac, a lover of rare books just like the holder of this copy, a apartment which in relation to a few secondary points features in 'Le Côté de Guermantes'. With all his gratitude, Marcel Proust."

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To Maurice Darlu:

"To Monsieur Maurice Darlu. In affectionate memory. Marcel Proust"

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To Lucien Daudet:

"My dear little one, you are absent from this book: you are too much a part of my heart for me to depict you objectively, you will never be a 'character', you are the best part of the author. But when I think how many years of my life were spent on the 'côté de chez Lucien', on the rue de Bellechasse, in Bourg-la-Reine, the words 'Lost time' take on different sounds to me, very sad, but very beautiful too. One day may we 'find it again'. In any case for you who have painted the pagoda of Chanteloup and the roses of Easter all is found again and will be preserved eternally."

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To Lucien Daudet:

"My little rat, how I would like it if an Aubrelique and a Brisacier were in this book. With all my fond admiration for you. Marcel Proust."

To Lucien Descaves:

"To Monsieur Lucien Descaves. With the author's compliments. Marcel Proust."

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To Dr Abel Desjardins:

"To my childhood friend Docteur Abel Desjardins, Marcel"

To Robert Dreyfus: (1913)

"To Monsieur Robert Dreyfus. As a token of affectionate friendship. Marcel Proust."

To Robert Dreyfus: (1919 NRF edition)

"To Robert Dreyfus. Another Swann which he already has! But to furnish him with a more homogeneous looking set. Alas I haven't any on "good paper". The Society of Bibliophiles subscribes in advance to all of them from the N.R.F. (without any preference for my books). And I really wanted to send you a Swann so as to put a pretty dedication in for you, but I have been so ill since my move that I am practically senile. And I am making do with sending you the three volumes that have come out today with my affectionate friendship. Marcel Proust.
I actually received a few "author's copies" yesterday but they were all "second editions". So I didn't want to send you one of those."

To Mme Duclaux:

"To Mme Duclaux. In admiring and respectful homage."

To Robert de Flers:

"To Robert de Flers, whose noble life unites heroic deeds with beautiful works. His friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Ernst Forssgren:

"To Ernst Forssgren, in testimony of my perfect admiration, and of my sincere remembrance. Marcel Proust."

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To André Foucart:

"To André Foucart with all my deep and admiring affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Anatole France:

"To M. Anatole France. To the first Master, the greatest and most beloved, with the respectful gratitude of Marcel Proust who always calls him Nabi and in memory of 'Lost Time'."

To Anatole France:

"...One of the human beings whom I love most deeply..."

To Louis Ganderax:

"To Monsieur Louis Ganderax. As a token of ardent affection. Marcel Proust."

To Louis Gautier-Vignal:

"To one of the only creatures in whose makeup is found only the purest components, devoid of envy, ambition, malice, and all the rest, (because this is only negative and there are positive qualities). Marcel Proust."

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To Bernard Grasset:

"To Monsieur Bernard Grasset, in affectionate and devoted memory. Marcel Proust."

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To Armand Duc de Guiche:

"To the Duc de Guiche.
Dear friend, I have at last found a first edition of Swann (not yet one of A L'Ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs, but this will not be long, I hope) and I am sending it to you with grateful affection. Marcel Proust."

To Daniel Halévy:

"To Daniel Halévy. In friendly memory. Marcel Proust."

To Léon Hennique:

"To Monsieur Léon Hennique, his admirer, Marcel Proust."

To Lucien Henraux:

"To Lucien Henraux. His friend, Marcel Proust."

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To Édouard Hermann:

"Dear friend, I wanted to remind you of Ysaïe, you me and the great musician you misjudge but who plays so well, but this exercise in arrangement is beyond my strength and I am holding on to just enough to assure you of my friendship. Your, Marcel Proust."

[Above the dedication Proust had inscribed the music for the initial theme of Franck's Piano quintet in F minor.]

To Abel Hermant:

"To Monsieur Abel Hermant. In homage of my admiration and my grateful friendship. Marcel Proust."

To Edmond Hesse:

"To Monsieur Edmond Hesse. In fondest recollection of his devoted Marcel Proust."

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To Ernest Jubien:

"To Monsieur Ernest Jubien. In affectionate memory of the author. Marcel Proust."

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To Jacques de Lacretelle:

[Long dedication dated 20 April 1918 is translated in Selected Letters 4 1918-1922 and Letters of Marcel Proust, Mina Curtiss.]

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To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld:

"To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld. In memory of "lost" Time where we were happy, inhabited by those we all loved! His friend Marcel Proust."

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To Georges de Lauris:

"My dear Georges, I wanted you to receive one of the first copies my publisher sent me before the book goes on sale. You were the first to read fragments of it in the past and I am anxious to find out if you will extend the same good will to the whole book that you showed to those, and also if you deem it to be worthy of being read by Ginette. With all my affection, Marcel."

To Pierre Lavallée:

"To Pierre Lavallée. As a memento of a profound affection. Marcel Proust".

To Suzette Lemaire:

"My dear little Mademoiselle Suzette, here is the little book become very large. With my tender gratitude, your Marcel Proust".

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To Pierre Loüys:

"To Monsieur Pierre Loüys. In admiring homage and sympathy. Marcel Proust."

To the Marquise de Ludre: (1914)

"To Madame Marquise de Ludre in respectful homage. Marcel Proust."

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To the Marquise de Ludre: (1919)

"I do not think I will be in a state to come tomorrow evening. I will try to come and see you after dinner. I think your theory is quite audacious. 1st point nobody knows anything about insomnia. 2nd point. Insomnia stems from the demineralisation of the nervous cells. (How can you go from the 1st point to the 2nd). 3rd point in order to sleep you must start by giving up veronal etc. that demineralises. What does anybody know about it? - I realize that my way of using veronal is absurd. But it is a useful medicine in so much as that it brings on natural sleep through preliminary artificial sleep. Ask Bergson if he knows me to have any liking for trional. Your respectful admirer. Marcel Proust."

To Émile Mâle:

"To Émile Mâle in token of respectful admiration. Marcel Proust."

To Georges Félix Marchand:

"To Monsieur Georges Félix Marchand. In affectionate memory. Marcel Proust."

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To Dr Alfred Martin:

"To Doctor Alfred Martin. As a token of gratitude, Marcel Proust."

To Harry Melvill:

"May 1916: From the time Jacques Blanche painted your portrait and mine I hoped to become acquainted with you and it often occurred to me that on my arrival at our artist's that at any moment I would perhaps have the pleasure of meeting you, there in his studio. But that has all become what a poem (by Rosetti, I think) calls: 'What could have been, and what was not to be'. Day after day, the years have placed between our lives divergent wakes in space formed of waves that could never be crossed over. So it is, Monsieur, with a somewhat melancholy pleasure that I send you (in the full knowledge that for all that it will not be 'retrouvé') 'A la Recherche du Temps Perdu'. Marcel Proust."

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To Mineguishi: (Comte Joachim Clary's Japanese valet)

"...because I kept him up the most unearthly hours..."

To Paul Morand:

"Recipe: take the finest quality intelligence that exists, add equal quantities of sensuality, insolence and irony. Let the mixture set at the appropriate glacial temperature; and you will have a thick pink white cream laced with pink. Presently it will become animated, pass from the vegetable kingdom into a superior one, so as to become a sort of white tomcat with pink lips and a cruelly perspicacious eye. Further transformation: a diplomat intended for the loftiest career. Extreme vanity over recipes, since despite his general character, Paul Morand is unique. It seems he needs to have many mistresses and few friends, since his sensuality is for women, his insolence for men and his irony for everyone.But here some compensation has been offered to the old sick author. Because the remarkable intelligence of Morand becomes the refuge and the palace for errant books. And at times 'to understand' to a certain degree not being 'to equal' as the Boche say, but 'to surpass', the author seems rather to be Paul Morand and a simple consumer of discoveries who has brought understanding to the insolent artist, his devoted servant, Marcel Proust."

To Pol Neveux:

"To Monsieur Pol Neveux. As a token of my sympathetic gratitude. Marcel Proust."

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To Madame de Pierrebourg:

"To Madame Baronne de Pierrebourg. With respectful, admiring and grateful homage. Marcel Proust."

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To Marcel Plantevignes:

"To Marcel Plantevignes, to my dear reader of preference, the other Marcel."

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To Jacques Porel:

"To Jacques Porel who owes to none but himself "the pride" he inspires. And in fact, some memory, foolishly melancholic, that might be associated to him in this verse, he could imagine
A feather of iron that is not without beauty
Marcel Proust."

To Marcel Prévost:

"To Monsieur Marcel Prévost. In admiring homage. Marcel Proust."

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To Comte Primoli:

"To Monsieur Comte Primoli. As a token of respectful affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Comte Primoli:

"To Monsieur Comte Primoli. As a token of respectful and ardent affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Robert Proust:

"To my little brother, in memory of Lost time, recovered for a moment each time we are together. Marcel."

To Maurice Rostand:

"To Maurice Rostand, his admirer, his friend, Marcel Proust. Dear friend I received your telegram. No my feelings haven't changed at all, and you add further to my gratitude.

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To Madame Rostand:

"To Madame Rostand. As a token of respectful admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Raymond Roussel:

"In affectionate gratitude and in exchange for the beautiful book that people have told me so much about and which I am going to read with great interest. Your devoted Marcel Proust."

To Bertrand de Salignac-Fénelon:

"My dear Bertrand, I sent you a first edition to Cuba on the first day. Now I hear that you are in Paris. So I am sending you a copy of the new printing, in the fear that my book would not reach the hands of one of the beings who I love most deeply. Marcel Proust."

To Paul Adrien Schayé:

"To Paul Adrien Schayé in memory of "The Flower of the beautiful age" and of "Lost time". With best wishes, Marcel Proust."

To Marie Scheikévitch:

[Translated in Against Sainte-Beuve - Proust's Revelations on the Continuation of his Novel]

To Jean Schlumberger:

"In admiring (not of M. Gustave Schlumberger but of you) and grateful memory. Marcel Proust."

To Madame Straus:

"To Mme Emile Straus, the only one of the beautiful things that I loved already at the period in which this book begins, for whom my admiration has not been changed, any more than has her beauty, her perpetually youthful charm.
With respectful homage.
Marcel Proust."

To Jacques Truelle:

"To Jacques Truelle. This dictionary of our friendship, this lexicon of our parallel memories, and in which he is more sensible than me. Your friend Jacques Truelle."

To Jean-Louis Vaudoyer:

"Dear friend, your letter filled me with joy. And yet I am very unhappy at the moment. I would like to see you if at all possible to talk about travel, expatriation. If you know of a peaceful, isolated house in Italy, it doesn't matter where, I should like to go away. Or if I stay in Paris, I want you to transform it into a bigger Vicenza by the descriptions you give me. You don't happen to know if that Farnese palace (the Cardinal's), at a place which I think is called Caprarola, is to let? Alas at the very moment of the appearance of this book I am thinking about something else entirely. Your friend Marcel. "

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To Abbé Vignot:

"I would not have wished to send you this book before the new printing. A few of the errors that would have exasperated you have been removed. Your respectful admirer, Marcel Proust."

To unknown recipient:

"To create a love for the dried flowers of the lime tree. Marcel Proust."

To unknown recipient:

"With all my best wishes for that beautiful work and in the wish that your children might travel the way of Happiness. Marcel Proust."

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Other known dedicatees: Léon Daudet, Louis de Robert, Jacques Copeau, André Gide, Gaston Gallimard, Paul Claudel,  Mme de Noailles, Horace Finaly, Paul Ernest Hervieu, Comtesse Greffulhe, Jacques Bizet, Henri de Régnier, Henri Rochat (dedication in verse), Reynaldo Hahn, Jacques Copeau, Louis de Robert, Mme A. Daudet, Maurice Mayer (looted by Nazis), Pierre Loti.

 


A l'Ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs 1919

To Gabriel Astruc:

"To Monsieur Gabriel Astruc, who has promoted masterpieces by Debussy, Stravinsky, Maurice Dennis, Bakst, who has established Boris Godunov, and, in general, has made up for the failings of the Opéra-Comique, and of the Opéra, by creating a unique theatre, a true Temple of Music, Architecture and Painting, and who, so that out of disaster might once more be exalted as the highest artistic endeavour, has been gratefully acknowledged as we all know.
- More selfishly to the comprehensive and scrupulous reader of Swann, ever yours, Marcel Proust."

To André Beaunier:

"To André Beaunier. Memento of a friend from whom only illness has separated him and who he remembers with affection and admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Walter Berry:

"To Monsieur Walter Berry, who will see appear in this book - barely once more - some of those Guermantes who introduced me to him. As a token of admiring affection. Marcel Proust.
I am awaiting a first edition of Swann."

To Elie-Joseph Bois

"Dear Sir, you are too kind to have written to me. If I haven't sent you this book before it is because I have been searching for six months for a 1st edition for you, any other seems unworthy of you. Finally, after finding 4 or 5 first editions, I am going to send a book to Monsieur France and to Madame de Noailles. I will be very happy to see you soon so that you can see de visu the folly of your newspaper which every day since I got the Goncourt prize adds another year on my age to show that I am not merely unworthy of it on account of my talent. I see myself growing old with the rapidity of a character in a fairy tale. Your grateful admirer, Marcel Proust. 44 rue Hamelin."

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To René Boylesve: (2nd edition)

"To Monsieur René Boylesve. As a token of profound admiration. I will explain to you my dear sir how it is that I only send you these books that nobody yet has received and how, the 1st editions having been monopolized by I don't know which library, I have vainly searched for months for one for you. Marcel Proust."

To René Boylesve: (1st edition)

"To Monsieur René Boylesve. Dear sir, I have finally found a 1st edition. I am sending it to you. I have spoken to my editor. He is ready to revoke your subscription to the Original Editions. And I will send you those ones of my books. But perhaps there are other authors whose 1st editions you want. I hope to thank you soon face to face for your delightful letter. Your grateful admirer, Marcel Proust."

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To Mme Catusse:

"Dear Madame Catusse, these flowers - young girls or not - are not for me simply something that can rejuvenate a memory and guard against the grave. There is an after death as there is an aftermath of war. It has made me understand what I had a presentiment of, that everything on earth which Mama loved, everything most precious, best, is in you. When we spoke almost daily about you, I almost regret that nearly all the praises we bestowed on the unique gifts of your mind perhaps clouded for us what is so profound, so noble in your heart and which is the supreme measure of intelligence. Mama endlessly recalled to me the way you would sing: Let us take up arms for love, or your opinions be they on Balzac or on positivism. Could she have sufficiently guessed that one day, for the one she has left so wretched, so hopeless, you would show, because of her, in memory of her, such wonderful kindness, such sparkling intelligence and heart. The times when I adhere to recent - and very ancient - philosophies which maintain that the soul lives on, I lean towards her so that she might know everything I tell you, everything she owes to you. I wanted to tell you, from a pen dipped in the blood from my heart words which I think every day and which are more - I am sure you understand - more than a dedication, the supreme dedication. I have put all my heart into these pages. Receive them in memory of my Mother. Your respectful Marcel Proust."

To Colette:

"To Mme Colette. In tender and astonished memory of Mitsou. Marcel Proust."

To E. de Crauzat:

"To Monsieur E. de Crauzat to invite him to taste with me this stopping place, very meagrely flowery, in a rambling Recherche de Temps Perdu. Your much devoted Marcel Proust."

To Léon Daudet:

"To Léon Daudet, who does not like my books which does not prevent me from worshipping his (See Pastiches et mélanges, p.37) and himself. His grateful friend, Marcel Proust."

To Abel Desjardins:

[Dedication that Proust wrote on a loose sheet which he could insert in Swann or Jeunes filles en fleurs, but was less appropriate for Pastiches.]

"When I was still almost a child a joyous thing illuminated the sad years: it was the gift from Abel Desjardins of a photograph on the back of which he had inscribed these words: "To my best friend". Unfortunately this joyous thing was poisoned for two years, because after the words "To my best friend", there was this qualification "after (I no longer remember the first name) X". This X, who in any case I had never met, seemed to me the most enviable person in the world. But eventually, without my ever knowing why this X had had for me the infinite kindness as to lose favour in the eyes of Abel, one day Abel asked me for the photograph back, then returned it to me with the words "after X" crossed out. And I brought together in my blessings, Abel for having so much goodness, and X for having been so much in the wrong.
The objects that remain from that distant period are quite dead for me, so that recently, being obliged to leave Boulevard Haussmann, I burned precious autographs, manuscripts of which no copies exist, photographs that were now rare. But all of a sudden I stopped short in front of a little boy with a sharp nose, a joking expression, with a three cornered hat on his head and I cried out to the person who was putting to the flames for me everything that I had brought out in great sacks: "Oh no! not that one!" It was the photograph on which I was the best friend of Abel, after X, then quite simply the best friend. And that I could never burn, because it was still alive.
Marcel Proust."

To Robert Dreyfus:

"To Robert Dreyfus. In memory of the young girls in the Champs-Elysées and at the balls, where we each loved a different girl but both of whose names ended in I.
This still very incomplete Swann whose contour is perhaps even still not perceptible. The pending volumes to come, not yet printed but written, will make it all clear. His friend Marcel."

To William d'Eichtal:

"To Monsieur William d'Eichtal as a token of gratitude from the author. Marcel Proust."

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To Robert de Flers:

"To Robert de Flers. As a token of my tender, grateful and admiring affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Anatole France:

"To Monsieur Anatole France. Nabi, ever beloved, for six months, in spite of three removals, in a terrible state of ill health, I searched for a first edition of this book for you. I finally found it and am sending it to you in homage to my admiration, thanks and most tender and respectful attachment, and most faithful memory of the Past. Marcel Proust, 44, rue Hamelin. While I am waiting to find a first edition of Pastiches, I am provisionally sending you an atrocious edition, I daren't put in a dedication, as I am waiting to find a first edition."

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To Mrs John W. Garrett:

[From Selected Letters 3, 1910-1917.]

"I've written a few lines [...] on the delicious sensation I had one evening when you called goodnight to me from beneath the arcades at the Ritz, and your voice rose, pure as a nightingale's, from the depths of shadowy branches."

To Henri Ghéon:

"Dear Sir, a month ago I wrote you a long (very complimentary) letter of ten pages about your book; and I spoke at length about you as well. But it seems to me rather imprudent to talk about one's state (as in religious state) through which one has not yet effectively passed and which one anticipates only through mind and heart, so that I feared I might have been fishing in my letter, through lack - or excess - of intelligence about your state. Except that I didn't send it you and, as I have fallen gravely ill since then, I haven't been able to write to you again. With my very best wishes, Marcel Proust."

To Reynaldo Hahn:

"To Funibel, the most beloved, the kindest genius. Your old pony has now become a horse but still remains faithful. Marcel."

To Daniel Halévy:

"My dear Daniel, Your arguments are sound, and above all it is very kind of you not to have taken my letter "badly". I confess that yours only partly reassures me. Precisely because something is done "out of civic duty", it is very dangerous to adhere to false ideas, simply because of the virtues of the people who hold them. Because there is not much distance between adhering (in this way) to ideas, and giving carte blanche to deeds. Your example makes it very clear that the essentially Dreyfusard military were anti-revisionist because they knew what a good man General Gonse was etc. and had more confidence in the General Staff than in the Anarchists. In any case as for those men who "you have given proof about for years etc.", I've read their names. Is there a single one of them who could stand up to a bit of perceptive scrutiny?
I hasten to add that your judgement must be correct since I judge it with the same emotion that I felt in Margaret Ogilvy when the old lady says to her son: "Go and vote for your Gladstone's man". Besides, when I say the "names" I really mean their signatures. It is quite true that Francis Jammes enjoys the name of a great writer who has, or had, the brilliant gift of imagery. But his Catholic point of view is such that, even for him, one cannot give the stamp of authority to his signature (in such a case). One wonderful letter which he wrote to me several years ago showed the opposite because it was written in spite of his ideas. Don't imagine "my situation" to be good. It is atrocious. I weave nothing at all except my shroud, and so slowly, so painfully. Best to you Marcel Proust."

To Abel Hermant:

"To Monsieur Abel Hermant. Dear friend, if I send books to the Figaro it is not that I address them to the Critic and not to the admired and beloved Master. But I don't know where you live at present. All the relevant information I might have had has been lost in the horror of my removals. And on the other hand it has had such a disastrous effect on my health that I don't have the strength to go and find out. I hope that by sending this sequel (which still leaves a lot before you see the whole) to Swann, to the Figaro, I might say to the book 'Off you go you poor migratory bird, may God direct you to your destination'. And to you: 'Read as much of it as you can'. In memory of Dear Coutras who made me weep so much. Marcel Proust."

To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld:

"To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld. As a token of deep affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Jacques de Lacretelle

"To Jacques de Lacretelle. In memory of the young girl from Provins who I did not know. Very affectionately, Marcel Proust."

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To Mme Lemaire:

"Dear Madame Lemaire, it is quite certain that I was not visiting anyone (and was at home) one day that I would have been able to be at your house. Had it not been I would have been with you. But it is possible that I didn't have a motor car one Monday and that I had one on Thursday, or that someone else had taken it. I would need to remember in order to swear on it. You reproach Boni de Castellane to me, as you did the Murats in the past. You haven't changed in your manner of reproaches; besides the Murats... (I will send you Pastiches et Mélanges one of these days. Alas that has put me out of favour with Albufera which has pained me deeply. As for society I couldn't care less about it and I have proved as much in Pastiches).
You speak quite lightly about my removals that in my cardiatic state put me at greater risk that a soldier in combat and with less joy. But why am I making recriminations when I feel nothing for you but tenderness and admiration, did you not know, all those newspapers, and my articles, do they not recall it to you, oh dear, oh great Madame Lemaire.
Your Marcel."

To Suzette Lemaire:

"... know that to me you will always be a young girl in flower (who never replies to my questions)... know that Reynaldo (who is in Cannes at the moment) and I remain the same for you, with the most respectful and the most admiring tenderness ... know that your mother is very ill-natured toward me and I love her no less for that. Your Marcel Proust".

To the Marquise de Ludre:

"To Madame the Marquise de Ludre, who was able so benevolently to set upon Swann her flustered, ravishing, attentive and lucid gaze, and to reflect onto this book better than through the lens of an opera-glass, all the facets of her cloudless intelligence.
To Madame de Ludre who I would so much like to see again and with whom I would much prefer to chat face to face at the fireside, than this stroll "in spirit and in truth" in the shadow of young girls in flower. Marcel Proust."

To Robert de Montesqiou:

"Could such warm proof of friendship really succeed in hiding such a cruel treachery?"

To Robert de Montesquiou"

To Monsieur Comte Robert de Montesquiou. As a token of an admiring and respectful affection which has not wavered for twenty five years. His loyal and respectful Marcel Proust."

To Madame de Noailles:

"[...] Madame, after six month's of searching I am delighted to have found this "first edition" for you. I didn't want to send you anything other. [...]"

To Madame Henri de Régnier:

"To Her Majesty Queen of the Kanaks (to whom the French, not knowing how to remember her name, have given this very pretty and justly glorious one of Gérard d'Houville) I send along with my heartfelt gratitude for her kindness, this finally located first edition. I hope soon to have one of Pastiches as well. And to remind her Kanak majesty that I am a no less fervent admirer of L'Inconstante, or Le Temps d'aimer than I am of Monsieur d'Amercoeur or of Bon Plaisir, I place at the feet of the Queen the homage of a faithful Kanak. Marcel Proust."

To Réjane:

"To Madame Réjane, to one who has lived the most beautiful life, to the creative spirit who has achieved a revolution in the art of theatre parallel to that which has brought back the novel and painting into the framework of Truth - to the Two Masks - to she who has inoculated us, through her Germinie,  with the recurrent fever whose attacks come upon us frequently, in intermittences, and finishing with the most beautiful of her creations, to the mother of Jacques. Respectful homage from an insufferable tenant. Marcel Proust."

To J. H. Rosny the elder:

"To J. H. Rosny the elder. Dear Sir and Master, as I can't recall which volume I sent you after "L'Appel au Bonheur", your marvellous "Appel au Bonher", I am sending you all three although without, alas, having found the editions I was looking for. Your respectful admirer, Marcel Proust."

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To Sydney and Violet Schiff:

"To Monsieur and Madame Schiff. In much affected gratitude for that marvellously comprehensive but distant geniality from two invisible guiding spirits and two patrons from that near but mysterious Isle. Marcel Proust.
With the solemn declaration that Swann will become more sympathetic in the next volume."

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To Princesse Soutzo:

"To Madame princesse Soutzo. It is a privilege of the artist who allows himself to situate a blessed memory wherever he likes, to place, on the most secret page of his book, the sad thoughts of mauve and yellow like an evening storm that has subsided, that he held for so long in his heart. All his disguise is for the good; sometimes he makes a shepherdess queen. Elsewhere the better to lead his readers astray he transports into the most mediocre surroundings a princesse's salon. You cannot have failed to recognize your own, my dear and incomparable Friend, in the one I portray here, enchanted by the Parsifalesque miracle of guelder roses. Swann instead of Soutzo is a voluntary misunderstanding, just as zibeline for ermine is a voluntary lapsus. Barely two or three of my friends, those that have the power to cause me joy or pain will appear in A la Recherche du Temps Perdu. You are perhaps the only one who, in the depths of your 'divans as deep as graves' has the power, I hardly dare say 'joyously' but I hope 'faithfully', to restore 'the tarnished mirrors, the extinguished flames'. Your respectful and grateful, Marcel Proust."

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To André Steinhard:

"To Monsieur André Steinhard. In very friendly remembrance from his devoted Marcel Proust."

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To Madame Straus:

"Dear Madame Straus, you who are the most admired, the most beloved, you are receiving this book after it has appeared! It is because I only had second and third editions, and wanted to find you this first edition, I will speak to you (when I am a little less dead, because I am at - 8 bis rue Laurent-Pichat, in a house where you can hear every word spoken by the neighbours, where you know every time a window is opened, where I have not slept for twenty days).
Your respectful and grateful
Marcel Proust."

To Mlle Tissot?: [addressed to a young girl of the society painter James Tissot's family]

"These young girls wreathed with the crown of youth into which it pleased Léon Daudet to interlace green laurel. Marcel Proust."

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To Jean-Louis Vaudoyer:

"Dear friend, for the last month I have been searching for first editions of these two books, without finding any. Some library has monopolized them without scruple and taken them in secret. I have not sent any off, not daring to send second editions or worse to great writers or to dear friends. I have one first edition. I think I am going to send it to Régnier. I didn't go to rue de Rivoli, as you no doubt know. And in any case I have only come here (8 bis, rue Laurent Pichat) because of a change of residence. I would love to hear all your news. Your grateful friend, Marcel Proust."

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Other known dedicatees: Henri Gans, Jean Cocteau.


Pastiches et Mélanges 1919

To Céleste Albaret:

"To the Queen of pastiche (pastiches of Nourritures Terrestres, of Madame Scheikevitch, of Monsieur Straus) to the Queen of pastiche, but a queen who one would prefer to be a little less imperious, a little more majestically and placidly queen. Her humble imitator and pasticheur, Marcel Proust."

To André Beaunier:

"To André Beaunier, your utterly devoted friend Marcel Proust. I wanted to write to you at greater length, but I am terribly ill. My provisional address (because on top of everything is added a change of home) is 8 bis rue Laurent Pichat. Please don't give it out. Not knowing whether you are still at the same rue Moncey, I am sending you this care of the Écho de Paris where you used to write when I still had my eyesight and could read the papers. And I think you still write for them. The Saint-Simon pastiche is new, the Balzac is totally changed. You already know the others."

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To Walter Berry:

"To Monsieur Walter Berry, who is perhaps the single noble product of the War. His grateful and admiring friend, Marcel Proust."

To René Blum:

"Dear friend (and I am going to say the same thing to your brother because, alas, the same applies) if I have taken such a long time to send you these books it is because I didn't want to send you anything but a first edition. Well I don't know which unscrupulous bookseller has monopolized them all but I couldn't find one. I have sent people out - for you - here there and everywhere. I was unable to look into it myself because, as you no doubt know, I have moved, which has come close to killing me. How pleased I would be to see you. Marcel Proust."

To René Boylesve:

"As a token of admiration to Monsieur René Boylesve. Marcel Proust."

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To Madame Catusse:

"Dear Madame Catusse, I have finally found you this first edition of Pastiches. And the Jeunes Filles en Fleurs will soon follow I hope. I assure you that with my way of life it is not at all easy, and please excuse my slowness, even more so when I tell you that I have still been unable - the fault of my books and my health - to send a single one to France, Barrès, Mme de Noailles etc. We said that we would see each other. Alas! Have you left Paris perhaps? If not, would you like to come and have dinner on the day of your choosing, 8 bis, rue Laurent Pichat, where I am still living. I could have Céleste's husband come and get you and bring you back. Or seeing as I will be getting up for you,would you prefer the Ritz? Your respectful friend, Marcel Proust."

To Louis Chadbourne:

"To Monsieur Louis Chadbourne. So that he might rediscover in this book two steeples that he was indulgent towards, and above all for this: "Such is how I see you, oh my friend, my brother, and my memory is like the heavy waters of summer; the deep sea of memories turns us over in the same folds; have me enter with you into your night". If I ever meet you "in the streets that flow like water" I will explain to you why I have neither "fine paper" nor "first editions" of Pastiches, which would have been for you. Marcel Proust."

To Jean Cocteau:

"To my dear Jean. With all my affection, Marcel."

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To Léon Daudet:

"In homage of admiration and gratitude. Your friend Marcel Proust."

To Lucien Daudet"

"To Lucien, who shows in these pastiches an all too fleeting profile and to whom one day I hope to express my tenderness and my admiration. His grateful friend, Marcel Proust."

To Lucien Descaves:

"As a token of admiration to Monsieur Lucien Descaves. Marcel Proust."

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To Robert Dreyfus:

"To Robert Dreyfus. As a token of my old and affectionate friendship, in gratitude for all the documentation that he furnished me on the Lemoine Affair and who alone has made possible the reconstitution of these pastiches that he would have been able to write just as well as me, and who in enjoying them and understanding them so perfectly, has encouraged me to continue.
His devoted Marcel Proust.
The Balzac is very changed and the Saint-Simon is entirely new."

To Albert Flament:

"To Albert Flament who is as delightfully practised in painting and writing with the pen and with the brush. Are we ever to renew the intimacy of the old days? I am remote from everybody, almost at the Porte du Bois, 8bis rue Laurent Pichat, in a house in which the neighbours' conversations and the cold prevent a moment's sleep. How I would love to find something in rue Castiglione, not too far from you. But will I see you again? Make a little effort so that we can start to see each other again because I have never ceased to admire you. Marcel Proust."

To Henri Ghéon:

"To Monsieur Henri Ghéon. If there survives in him something of the perfect critic that he was and which he has renounced for a more real greatness. Most affectionately, Marcel Proust."

To André Gide:

"Dear friend, undoubtedly you know the whole story of removals, aggravated illness, the monopolization of my books by libraries which has prevented me from sending you a first edition until now. I would really like to know your address so that I can see you one day. Your admirer and friend Marcel Proust."

To Abel Hermant:

"To Monsieur Abel Hermant. As a token of my profound admiration and affection. Marcel Proust.
I would really like to know if Jacques de L[acretelle] has returned, which I wonder from all the rumours. Just in case, I have elicited an author's copy for him and the good [pages]."

To Maurice Hermès[?]:

"To Monsieur [...] As a token of profound friendship. Marcel Proust." [Name of recipient erased]

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To Valery Larbaud:

"To Valery Larbaud. An admirer of Enfantines, who, after a year, is still a little ill from Couperet. Marcel Proust."

To Jacques de Lacretelle:

"To Jacques de Lacretelle, this edition unworthy of him. Marcel Proust."

To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld:

"To Gabriel de La Rochefoucauld. His grateful and devoted friend. Marcel Proust."

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To Georges de Lauris:

"To my dear George de Lauris, with all my tenderest admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Robert de Montesquiou:

"To Comte Robert de Montesquiou. In homage of an admiring and respectful attachment. Marcel Proust. I have indicated (p.73) where the portrait of you starts. It is only an unfinished sketch, in which however I hope you will recognise my steadfast ardour."

On page 73 Proust wrote: "Dear Sir, it starts here."

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To Henri de Régnier:

"To Monsieur Henri de Régnier. (I have been waiting to  find a first edition for a first piece of admiration). Marcel Proust."

To Madame Straus:

"To Madame Straus, this second edition so that she will be able to see her portrait (a first sketch which will be continued), while I wait until I have a first edition.
In homage of my respectful admiration and tender and grateful affection.
M.P."

To Jacques Truelle:

"To Jacques Truelle, these transpositions of our conversations about the great writers and the world of society. With affectionate friendship, Marcel Proust."

 


Le Côté de Guermantes I 1920

To Jean Ajalbert:

"To Monsieur Jean Ajalbert. In respectful admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Florence Blumenthal (Oct 1921):

"To Madame Blumenthal. With respectful and admiring homage.
Here, Madame, is this first edition of Guermantes I that I have kept for you for a year and which is impossible to get hold of today. I tried to find one for Guiche but failed. You were in America. So I could not send it sooner. Since then Guermantes II has appeared, but accompanied with Sodome et Gomorrhe. So I dare not send you that other volume, knowing how little favourable the Americans are towards this sort of clinical study."

To Jacques Boulenger:

"To Jacques Boulenger. As a token of gratitude. His friend (if that is not indiscreet). Marcel Proust."

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To Comtesse de Chevigné:

"Madame, it is true that wanting a book in which there is so much of you, being on a singular paper and in a copy fit for you, I have lost much time. And moribundity having returned I have no longer been able to trouble myself with these printing matters. Nevertheless it seems to me that the present (in the sense of the gift) was to have created this book out of you. And its material covering, and whether it was bought by me or by you, matters little: you disagree with me on this. So here is a copy (Alas, there are none left but horrible ones, but I will keep looking in any case) since you attach more importance to reams of paper than than to sweetness of heart. The hellishness of misunderstandings, but which stems from your facility for falling into traps, stems from the word snobbishness that was rejected as long as twenty years ago, just like the "Clerical Peril" etc... To how many duchesses have I not replied when they exclaim: "But she is no duchesse, she is a woman from the world of petty Jewish salons", have I not replied [sic]: "She has more breeding than you". A strange snobbishmess that consists in visiting nobody (all this is too tedious to explain here). In reality one must demonstrate that Places and People lose something when we come near to them. Balbec for the place, Guermantes for the people. I am too weary to explain to you with what logic I have developed all this, which the great Danish newsaper, the Politiken, has understood perfectly, but you have been completely taken in by the petty side. I prefer to maintain the better position albeit with infinite difficulty. Your respectful Marcel Proust."

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To Colette:

"To Madame Colette. In homage of admiration and deep gratitude (I can't write more I have a fever of 41 etc) your respectful friend. Marcel Proust."

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To Léon Daudet:

[Written after the printed dedication to Daudet: "to the author of so many masterpieces and incomparable friend in testament to my gratitude and admiration."]

"... to which I add a tenderness which I dared not express in the printed dedication in case you accused me of over familiarity..." At the top of the page he also wrote: "I beg you to place my respectful gratitude at the feet of Mme Léon Daudet."

To Lucien Descaves:

"To Monsieur Lucien Descaves. As a token of admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Jacques Derval (or Duval):

"To Monsieur Jacques Derval [Duval?] as a token of gratitude. Marcel Proust."

To Robert de Flers:

"To my dear Robert with all my admiring gratitude and deep affection that a fever of 41 degrees cannot prevent me from expressing this evening, tenderly, his admirer and friend, Marcel."

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To Gaston Gallimard:

"To my dear Gaston, I hardly suspected when I saw you for the first time... that I would one day owe you so much gratitude, and the absurd fidelity that this real and sometimes imaginary cuckold has to the NRF. Affectionately, Marcel Proust."

To Armand Duc de Guiche:

"Dear Friend, what a nuisance! I notice that the second copy of Guermantes II is the same as the one you have which I have just dedicated to you. Now, at last, the nth time! there is no doubt that it is really Guermantes I. With all the friendship of your devoted and grateful Marcel Proust.
Shall I see you again? And how?(Verlaine)."

To Abel Hermant:

"To Monsieur Abel Hermant. As a token of gratitude and admiration and affection, that a 41 degree fever has rendered a little abridged. Marcel Proust."

To André Lhote:

"To Monsieur André Lhote. As a token of my admiration. Marcel Proust."

To the Comte and Comtesse de Maugny:

"To Madame the Comtesse deMaugny and to my very dear Clément, my respectful homage to the first, all my tenderness to the second (who is also the first). Your admiring and devoted Marcel Proust."

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To Charles Régismanset:

"As a token of profound sympathy to Monsieur Régismanset. Marcel Proust."

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To André Salmon:

"To Monsieur André Salmon. As a token of friendship. Marcel Proust."

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To Jean Schlumberger:

"To Monsieur Jean Schlumberger. In memory of Mur de Verre. Marcel Proust."

To Madame Straus:

"To Madame Emile Straus with repectful homage and grateful admiration."

To Madame Jean Gustave Tronche:

"To Madame J.G. Tronche. With respectful and admiring homage from one who loves her husband very much. Marcel Proust."

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To Paul Valéry:

"To Monsieur Paul Valéry who, in Le Cimitère Marin, has set abstraction in a fluid concrete, as no one else had done until then. Admiring homage, Marcel Proust."

To Jean Valmy-Baisse:

"To Monsieur Valmy-Baisse With grateful respects. Marcel Proust."

To Jean-Louis Vaudoyer:

"To Monsieur Jean-Louis Vaudoyer. I fear that you haven't received 'Guermantes'. Half of my copies have disappeared... this is my last first edition and if this one goes astray again I wouldn't dare to send you a second edition, now that I know you are such a bibliophile. [...] to come and hear two or three Beethovens (very late because it seems these are the last of the musicians) [...] Your admiring friend, Marcel Proust."

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To an unknown recipient:

"Monsieur, I put a long dedication in Guermantes II, when it should have been the other way round. I have tried to send you copies that are not such late editions, but alas I could not find first editions, being long out of print. Your grateful and devoted Marcel Proust."

Other known dedicatees: Sydney Schiff, Henri Gans.


Le Côté de Guermantes II / Sodome et Gomorrhe I 1921

To Jean Ajalbert:

"To Monsieur Ajalbert, to the poet, to the novelist, to the Ephraïm Michaël of sensibility, to the Gaugin of prose. His admirer Marcel Proust."

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To Céleste Albaret:

"To my dear Céleste, my faithful friend of eight years, but in reality so united in my thoughts that it would be more true to call you my friend of always, no longer being able to imagine that I haven't always known you, understanding his spoilt childhood past in his caprices of today, to Céleste croix de guerre because she endured Gothas and Berthas, to Céleste who has endured the cross of my moods, to Céleste croix d'honneur. Her friend Marcel."

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To Maurice Barrès:

"In homage of my deep and respectful admiration, gratefully yours, Marcel Proust."

To Léon Blum:

"To Monsieur Léon Blum. Dear friend, have you received my Côté de Guermantes, my letters? I have the impression we are no longer in contact while - almost dying and incapable of writing a dedication - I have so much gratitude and friendship for you. Marcel Proust."

To Jacques Boulenger:

"To Monsieur Jacques Boulenger. In homage from his admirer who has the joy of knowing him very well and his friend who has the misfortune of not yet knowing him. Marcel Proust."

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To Duchesse de Clermont-Tonnèrre:

"To Madame the Duchesse de Clermont-Tonnèrre who will find on page 172 I think, an allusion to her description of asparagus. Her respectful and grateful admirer, Marcel Proust."

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To Colette:

"To Mme la Baronne de Jouvenel. Dear Madame, to say that I had dared hope that one day we would be friends! I no longer get out of bed since I can hardly see, and I wasn't even able to correct the proofs for this which was printed from the drafts. But it is maddening to have seen you and then to only know you as if we were living in two different epochs. Marcel Proust."

To Léon Daudet:

"To my dear Léon. In tender homage of profound gratitude. In memory of the Past Outlived. Marcel Proust."

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To Lucien Descaves:

"To Monsieur Lucien Descaves. With the respectful compliments of the author. Marcel Proust."

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To Robert Dreyfus:

"To Monsieur Rober Dreyfus. In affectionate memory of his old and very ill friend. Macel Proust."

To Robert de Flers:

"To Robert de Flers (who I can never manage to find at Le Gaulois) with all my tenderness, my gratitude and my admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Gaston Gallimard:

"Dear friend, may I dedicate this book to you like this in your presence. Modesty forbids me from putting down in writing before your eyes the profound affection I feel for you. Marcel Proust."

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To Gaston Gallimard:

"To you, my dear Gaston, whom I love with all my heart (although you sometimes think the opposite is true!) and with whom it would be so nice to spend long and cheerful evenings. But you never take the initiative. Mine always come to grief in front of my telephone as "aloof" as during the time when you refused Swann. Your very grateful and very faithful and very affectionate friend. Marcel Proust."

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To André Gide:

"To André Gide, homage of an affection and an admiration that cannot be condensed into a few words like this, written whilst people were addressing me. And with infinite gratitude for the adorable Billet à Angèle."

To Armand Duc de Guiche:

"Dear Friend, ou tell me that you have no had Guermantes I? Catastrophe for me! Here is an ordinary copy of it so that you can follow and read Guermantes II. Every day just recently I have been looking, without success, for an 'original' of Guermantes I. But whilst waiting for me to find it, read this in order to 'follow on' as one says in music. You nearly saw me the other morning. I went with Vaudoyer to look at the Vermeers and Ingres. I went off to the Ritz but the dining-room and its draughts alarm me a little and I rarely eat there, except in a room upstairs which, no doubt, would be very tiresome for you. Nevertheless, I miss you very much and am afraid of forgetting you.

To Armand Duc de Guiche:

"To the Duc de Guiche, Marcel Proust.

Dear Friend, you have never acknowledged receipt of Guermantes I. This is not a reproach but to explain to you that I am sending, not without some hesitation, Guermantes II. In spite of this hesitation, you are one of the few people whom I really like and whom I wish to see again before the day of final separation. I hope that your friendship continues to respond to my own and that you are not tired of a compassion so rare and of books so frequent. Your true and grateful Marcel Proust."

To Reynaldo Hahn:

"My little Reynaldo, who I no longer see, I know that you don't care for first editions. But all the same they are on much nicer paper than the others. And then to send to the one I love most in the world something that is not the first... [incomplete]"

To Abel Hermant:

"To Monsieur Abel Hermant. As a token of profound admiration and affection. Marcel Proust.
I'd like to know if Jacques de L. has returned so that I can ask him all the gossip. In any case I got him an author's copy yesterday on good paper."

To Jacques de Lacretelle:

"My dear Jacques, it was very wearisome of you not to have told me the page which I was going to copy out. That will entail a new appointment. I am delighted. But this has delayed my sending you a copy. Affectionately yours with the highest esteem for your flawless and limitless intelligence. Marcel Proust."

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To Robert Proust:

"To my beloved brother who I love and admire from the bottom of my heart. Your Marcel."

To Charles Régismanset:

"To Monsieur Régismanset. With the desire felt by the author of these compact and little-read books for your intense sparks that set alight everything around them. Your grateful Marcel Proust."

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To Jacques Rivière:

"I merely say to you again how much I admire and how much I like you."

To Robert de Rothschild:

"Dear friend, I have taken a long time before replying to you. But I was trying to unearth such a rare edition that... it doesn't exist! But there would be no merit in searching - and from one's bed - if it weren't to lay one's hand on the untraceable. Here it is. - Let us continue to decline the verb to find. You will find at a dinner further on pheasants less beautiful than yours, the imaginary Royal Dutch, a Princesse de Parme who is not noble and your own people, and above all "find" here the token of my faithful friendship. Marcel Proust."

To André Salmon:

"To Monsieur André Salmon. As a token of admiring friendship. Marcel Proust."

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To Jean Schlumberger:

"To Jean Schlumberger, with whom I hope to efface the memory of the heavy footed Gustave."

To Monsieur and Madame Straus:

"To Monsieur and Madame Emilie Straus, begging them to read the episode about the red shoes that I went to find one evening, and not to forget, ever, the respectful affection of their grateful friend.
Marcel Proust."

To Jean-Louis Vaudoyer:

"Dear friend, I am provisionally sending you this and I will try and find a first edition for you. [...] I only remember the verses on Cuyp. They were written prior to class at Condorcet, coming out of the Louvre where I had just seen the horsemen that have a pink feather in their hat. [...] You will see in Guermantes II that the duchess was no more satisfied with her portrait by Elstir than the models of the great painters were with theirs. And when saying that I wasn't able to imitate you, because it was printed and on sale a month before the wonderful outing for which I remain so profoundly and affectionately grateful to you. [...] Marcel Proust."

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To unknown recipient (possibly Lucien Daudet [provenance of Julien Green]):

"Dear friend, I have not understood your recent silences at all. Very much yours. Marcel Proust."

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Other known dedicatees: Mme de Chevigné, André Gide, Princesse Soutzo, Colette, Antoine Bibesco.

 


Sodome et Gomorrhe II 1922

To Jacques Bainville:

"To Monsieur Jacques Bainville. To proactive Reason from which events follow too late their infallible, terrifying and graceful order..."

To Maurice Barrès:

"To Monsieur Maurice Barrès, as a token of respectful and profound admiration, his grateful Marcel Proust."

To Henri Bergson:

"...to the first geat metaphysicist since Leibnitz (and greater yet). His creative system may evolve, but it will always retain the name of Bergson..."

To Henri Béraud:

"As a token of admiration to Monsieur Béraud and with my very ardent affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Henry Bidou:

"In admiring homage to Monsieur Henry Bidou (who I waited for for a whole evening and who has never replied to me. I think however that my letter hasn't reached you, as I daren't swear that I had it posted). Marcel Proust."

To Gus Bofa:

"To Monsieur Gus Bofa. In genial and admiring acknowledgement. Marcel Proust."

To Jacques Boulenger:

"To Jacques Boulenger. His admirer, his grateful friend, Marcel Proust."

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To M. Binet Valmer:

"To Monsieur Binet Valmer. Dear friend I wrote you a long letter not 24 hours ago. I am too tired this evening but I finally have my book and I send it to you - with all my admiration and grateful affection. Marcel Proust."

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To Florence Blumenthal: (May 1922)

"To Madame George Blumenthal, to the beautiful, ingenious, indefatigable, efficacious Incarnation of Goodness. Respectfully, Marcel Proust."

To Lucien Descaves:

"To Monsieur Lucien Descaves. As a token of admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To James Destres

"To Monsieur James Destres. In profound friendship, Marcel Proust."

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To Henri Duvernois:

"To Henri Duvernois his most grateful and admiring friend. Marcel Proust."

To Robert de Flers:

"To my dear Robert. His grateful friend who admires him and embraces in their melancholy and sweet totality so many memories of his dear grandmother and his sisters of the exquisite necks. Marcel Proust."

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To Henri Gans: (Dedication on the proofs for Sodome et Gomorrhe II sent to Henri Gans)

"I offer and dedicate this unique copy, weary from its journey to Alsace-Lorraine, but preserving its value.
To my friend Henri Gans these caricatures, (as they say, making a youthful appearance in favour of  "Ta Bouche" and my book, an unjustly eclipsed expression, but which, now having gained it like Patron, cannot fail to make a fortune. With very profound and grateful affection, Marcel Proust."

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To Gustave Geffroy:

"To Monsieur Gustave Geffroy. As a token of profound and grateful admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Henri Massis:

"To Monsieur Massis. As a token of my very ardent friendship. Marcel Proust."

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To Comtesse de Noailles:

"Miraculous incarnation in a female body of the genius of Hugo, Vigny, Lamartine. Respectful homage from one who could always call himself her friend, in the blessed, less difficult and always favoured days. Marcel Proust."

To Jean de Pierrefeu:

"To M. Jean Pierrefeu. In sympathetic and already far distant memory. Most cordially, Marcel Proust."

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To Marie de Régnier:

"...poor Nijinsky... of Le Spectre de la rose and the lunatic asylum..."

To Louis de Robert:

"...I have been almost unable to send out any books..."

To Sydney Schiff:

"To Monsieur and Madame Sydney Schiff. You alone seem to me what one constantly seeks.
Dear Sydney I have a thousand things to write you. Don't go to live at the Ritz. Is this the paper you prefer, this seems better to me but I know nothing about it. Command and I shall obey. Could you send me the address of M. Middleton Murry. But preferably to the concièrge without coming up. A thousand endearments dear Sydney and at the feet of Madame Schiff as much as you judge compatible with the respect of Marcel Proust. "

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To Edmond Sée:

"To Monsieur Edmond Sée. As a testament of great admiration, and of long and faithful friendship. Marcel Proust."

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To Paul Seippel:

"To Monsieur Paul Seippel. As a token of admiration. Marcel Proust."

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To Constantin Ullmann:

"To Constantin Ullmann. This book is to take the place of all the phone calls I never answered, and the letter I never had the strength to write. With great affection, your Marcel Proust. What is become of your fairy story?"

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To Fernand Vandérem:

"To Fernand Vandérem. With admiring and grateful homage from a great friend who has been dying since he last saw him. But I think I'm getting better and perhaps I will rise again, so this dedication is practically a letter with menaces! Marcel Proust."

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To Jean-Louis Vaudoyer:

"I cherish the luminous memory of one morning when you affectionately guided my tottering steps towards that Vermeer where the gables of the houses 'were like precious Chinese objects'."

[The full, long dedication is translated in Selected Letters 4, 1918-1922.]

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To unknown recipient (Paul Souday?):

"It seems to me that having touched the abyss, my health is recovering."

 Other known dedicatees: Léon Daudet, Edmond Jaloux, Paul Souday, Jean Ajalbert, Pierre-André May, François Mauriac, John Middleton Murry, Louis Brun, Réné Gimpel, Mme Straus, Jean Béraud, Marcel Boulanger.

Unknown volumes of RTP dedicated to: Simone de Caillavet (looted by Nazis), Duc Armand de Gramont (looted by Nazis)

 


Les Oeuvres libres (Jalousie) 1921

To Odilon Albaret:

"To Odilon Albaret, his old friend of almost twenty years (a friendship that by its long standing does not make me feel any younger, but which has renewed it for him. But now that he has strength, health and youth may he not abuse them. May he maintain his reserves of strength. He is his own master, so that he sleeps more, at his own hours. He is at full liberty to do so since his own works are free works too). Affectionately, Marcel Proust."

To Sydney Schiff:

"Dear friend, here is the piece in Les Oeuvres libres, so full of errors that I hardly dare send it to you but be that as it may, next to your wonderful letters the moving force of which with their delectable sweetness they must be the writings that will last, even in the simplest things. Madame Schiff and yourself have a zest that impregnates everything and makes them delightful. Coming from you any banality seems to me to be impossible. Please place my respects at the feet of Madame Schiff and trust that I love you both infinitely."

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To unknown recipient:

"With the author's compliments. Marcel Proust."

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Dedications on photographs etc.

To Céleste Albaret: (photograph)

"To my dear Céleste - her old Marcel."

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To Céleste Albaret: (photograph)

"To Céleste, in fond and grateful memory of her detested tyrant."

To Paul Brach (c.1922):

[Dedication accompanying a reproduction of the Jacques-Emile Blanche 1892 portrait of Proust.]

"To Monsieur Paul Brach, who knew so well how to render anew 'argentine' rhyme. In affectionate remembrance, Marcel Proust."

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To Paul Brach (c.1922):

[Dedication accompanying a reproduction of the Jacques-Emile Blanche 1892 portrait of Proust.]

"To Monsieur Paul Brach, this ghastly heliogravure. His friend Marcel Proust."

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To Gaston de Caillavet:

[Dedication on a photograph of Proust in uniform during his military service, 1889-1890.]

"To the one and only Gaston from his Marcel Proust."

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To Robert de Flers: (photograph)

"To my dear little Robert, his unfailingly faithful and tender friend. Marcel Proust."

To Ernst Forssgren: (photograph)

"To Ernst Forssgren. Fond memories M.P."

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To Gustave Tronche (c.1919):

[Dedication accompanying a reproduction of the Jacques-Emile Blanche 1892 portrait of Proust.]

"To my very dear friend Gustave Tronche. With fond affection Marcel Proust."

To Arthur Toupine:

[Dedication separated from unknown book]

"To Monsieur Arthur Toupine. As a token of high literary esteem. Marcel Proust."

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.Last updated: 07.11.17

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